Spring in Normandie

trouville normandy

(Yes, that’s Normandie as in French, sorry but I cannot bring myself to write Normandy, I think the y removes all the French glamour immediately.)

I had been thinking about traveling to that region of North-West France since a few years now, after seeing pictures of Honfleur and Deauville in some travel article, and falling in love with the coloured front row houses and vintage beach changing rooms. I also wanted to see the disappearing Mount Saint-Michel, but didn’t have time for that this time. (They say every time you travel, it’s better to leave some things off for a future visit 🙂 )

Giverny or the impressionist dream

If you come from Paris, as me and my sister did, I would recommend making a first stop by Giverny before heading towards the beach and visiting the Fondation Claude Monet. Especially if you’re coming in Spring. Remember those marvellous huge Water Lilies paintings? They were painted here.

Monet, one of my favorite painters, built his own garden with flowers that would grow all year long in front of his house. Once I saw the scenery, I realized that 2 hour-drive and the 40-minute waiting in line under the sun to get in were well worth it. I will let my pictures speak for themselves.

maison monet house jardin garden

jardin garden giverny monet

Discover more this way!

The Art of Jerusalem

Jerusalem art for peace
Picasso once said, “Todo lo que puede ser imaginado es real” (Everything that can be imagined is real). So when Ahmad and Oren imagined a safeguarded space for citizens of Jerusalem where they could express themselves through art and leave behind any cultural, political or religious differences, they made it real.

They first found a rooftop in no man’s land in the old city of Jerusalem. A misused space full of garbage somewhere in between the Christian, Muslim and Jewish quarters. Anyone who has visited or lived in the Holy City, will know that the population usually stays around their own neighborhood and rarely intertwines with their neighbors. So, to find a place which is easily accessed from the different quarters appears to me like a sign that this project, called Jerusalem Art,  was simply meant to be.

CLICK HERE TO SEE WHAT THEY DID!

Barcelona from the magic mountain: Tibidabo Views

pANORAMIC VIEW OF bARCELONA FROM TIBIDABO

There’s no excuse. It’s been almost 4 months since my last update, the longest period of time I have remained inactive since I started this project back in 2011.

However, I’ve always believed that quality beats quantity, and that means some times I rather wait until something worth it comes up.

For example going up to the Tibidabo Amusement Park, one of my favorite spots when I was a kid. Don’t get me wrong I didn’t actually go into the park and ride the attractions. I just went up the mountain and enjoyed the breathtaking views of Barcelona, completely worth it!

Barcelona views from Tibidabo

My relationship with Tibidabo started as far back as I can remember. My grandfather used to drive the tramway that connects Barcelona to the funicular that goes on top of the mountain and for that reason we got free entrances. I don’t know how many birthdays I celebrated (or attented to) in Tibidabo, but I never got tired of it!

If you plan to go up the mountain, and you don’t have a car, I recommend to take the bus in Plaça Catalunya, otherwise the price of the combination of metro + tramway + funicular will go higher.

Tibidabo Amusement Park

Tibidabo allows you to enter the top floor of the park without a ticket and wander around the most classical attractions: the merry-go-round, the wheel and the watchtower.

 Expiatory Church of the Sacred Heart of Jesus Tibidabo

From there you can also have a closer look at the  Expiatory Church of the Sacred Heart of Jesus (Sagrat Cor), with a combination of different styles ranging from Romanesque to Modernist. But as I said before, the main point of going up the mountain are the excellent views of the city. Don’t miss it out!

barcelona views from Tibidabo

Universal children’s day around the world

Over the course of my trips I like to take pictures, not only of the main attractions, but also of locals and their way of life. To celebrate the Universal Children’s Day I’ve made a selection of some of my travel photos where kids are the main characters.

Miyazima (Japan)

One of the places I highly recommend you to visit is the beautiful island of Miyajima in Japan. There’s a a Torii Gate that seams to float on the water when tides are high, and when they are low you can approach it by foot. You can see its red reflection in the background and the little kid playing with sand and water.

japan kid miyajima

Atlas (Morocco)

When we travelled to Marrakech in 2011 with my family we made a trip to the mountains of Atlas. It was like a trip in time seeing those kids playing with toys from my grand parent’s time.

kids in morocco atlas

Jardins du Luxembourg (Paris)

While visiting my sister in Paris last year, I took my camera and went for a walk in the beautiful gardens of Luxembourg. In the pond it was possible for kids to rent little boats and let them float away,

kid paris little boat

Nara (Japan)

Again in Japan we met this group of cute schoolkids visiting Nara in front of its Buddhist temple.

school kid japan nara

Poblesec (Barcelona)

Correfocs are very popular in the Catalan tradition, it consists of a group of Diables ( Devils) lighting fireworks and dancing. I had never seen such a young and proud diable before!

kid in barcelona correfoc

Hope you enjoyed those pictures, have a great day!

Follow the red balloon path in Barcelona

On my way home yesterday I decided to go through la plaça Sant Jaume challenging the tourists crowds that often take on Barcelona’s Gothic quarter. Fortunately, the square was not crowded, however something caught my attention immediately: a series of red balloons randomly scattered around.

barcelona red balloon sant jaume

Everybody seemed to wonder what they represented and who had placed them there, (even the police, who after checking one of them decided they were no harm to anybody).

barcelona red balloon gothic quarter

The image was beautiful and soon I discovered that there was a red balloon path going up Sant Honorat street and followed it.

barcelona landscape red balloon

I didn’t have to wait long to find out about the responsible of the installation as at the crossroad with Sant Domènech del Call I noticed two girls dropping some balloons. They told me they were from BCNLandscape a platform uniting several architects and environmentalists working on different types of projects all related to landscape.

barcelona red balloons gothic quarter

I kept following the path that ended up at Plaça Sant Felip Neri. There I couldn’t help but smile at the views of school kids on their lunchbreak holding a red balloon and running around the square. There was some kind of magic in it, something so simple as a balloon can still catch the attention of kids and make them happy. A little victory over our technology dominated world.

barcelona red balloon sant felip neri kids

In the end I didn’t find out what was exactly the purpose of this action, but like many pieces of art, it’s better not to ask why and just enjoy the beauty in it.

What do you think?