The boat kid

I’m thins kind of person. I tend to start things with unstoppable energy and motivation, I constantly think of new things to do and new ways to improve what’s already done, a word, an image triggers my imagination and I picture in my head a new blog post, a new way to tell a story.

However, as routine bites hard (especially now that I have a job consisting in blog writing) and I feel I cannot dedicate as much time and energy as I’d like to, I sometimes rather stop creating than doing something halfway. This explains my silence during the past months, today I break it for good.

Some stories have to be told. Halfway maybe, not as profound or clear or original as I’d like, but they certainly deserve we remember them and tell everyone about their existence.

This is the story about one of the warmest hearts I’ve ever encountered. This is the story about Bob and the exhibition in his memory “El noi vaixell” ( The Boat Kid). (I will tell you another day about Bob the writer and artist)

The Boat kid goes on here…

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What to wear?

The way we dress is a covering letter, depending on our skills choosing the proper outfit we can assure a good first impression… and we all know you never get a second chance to cause a good first impression.
Barcelona’s design museum DHUB has organised an exhibition called What to wear? dealing with the concept of dressing as a part of building our identity. The exhibition includes around 50 pieces from the Maria Brillas endowment, all of them created by one of the finest 20th century Spanish designers Pedro Rodríguez.

The museum decided to make the visit as participative as possible including a series of activities in parallel of the exhibition. A social media campaign  was launched asking users about their fashion dilemmas when choosing an outfit and last week a vintage cocktail was organised at the museum demanding a vintage etiquette. As usual you can check my Flickr gallery of the event:

Còctel què em poso?

A good example of how a good use of online and offline campaigns are able to, not only boost the number of visits by providing a wider notoriety, but also make the experience of the exhibition much more participative and enjoyable.